bamboosd.jpg


The Plant


Phyllostachys Bambusaoides, commonly known as Japanese Timber Bamboo, has thick walled culms which are very straight and dark green. Short branches with long leaves grow near the top of the plant ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008). When the plant is young, it can grow branches around the middle of the culms. How tall the plant gets depends on its climate.


Japanese Timber Bamboo among other tree("Japanese timber bamboo," 2010)
Japanese Timber Bamboo among other tree("Japanese timber bamboo," 2010)


Constant cold weather or temperatures under -15 degrees Celsius have the potential to kill or limit its’ growth ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008). Japanese Timber Bamboo can withstand temperatures which would be too cold for other giant boo types. It can even withstand snow! At ideal conditions, this plant can grow up to 40 inches in one day. On average they grow 15 meters, and have a diameter of 11 centimetres ("Phyllostachys bambusoides," 2003). At ideal conditions, they can grow to be up to be 22 meters, and be 15 centimetres in diameter ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008). How well it grows, depends on which climate it is grown in.



Trail lined with Japanese Timber Bamboo on each side ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2010)
Trail lined with Japanese Timber Bamboo on each side ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2010)


In areas with a lot of sun exposure, and high temperatures, Giant Timber bamboo will thrive. Though it originated in the Southern mainland of China, it is associated with Japan. Madake, as the Japanese call it, is the most common running plant in America; it can be found in Northern California, Oregon, and some parts of Washington ("Phyllostachys bambusoides," 2003). It is also grown in Australia ("Phyllostachys bambusoides," 2003).






Product


Since Bamboos are a type of grass, they require very little maintenance to grow. Like the grass in your front yard, they grow at a very fast rate. This makes Phyllostachys Bambuusoides a very sustainable resource.

Japanese Timber Bamboo has many uses. It is commonly used as a privacy screen. When put side by side, its tall height and leafy branches provide good privacy. It is also used in landscaping, and in Japanese spas, as it emits a tranquil mood. It also has Culinary uses; when they are young and new, they are edible (Ma, 1997-2010). At their early stages, they resemble artichokes, and these shoots can be eaten raw, but are usually boiled to eliminate the bitter taste (Hidalgo, 2010).


New Shoot emerging from the ground. ("Page not found," )
New Shoot emerging from the ground. ("Page not found," )


Finished product of shoots (JOONE, 2010)
Finished product of shoots (JOONE, 2010)


The most useful of all its uses has to be its capability of producing excellent construction material ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008). Having thick erect culms, which are thick, straight and get hard when dried ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008), is ideal for making furniture, decorations, and even flooring. In Canada, it is very easy to obtain these products. Online Auctions, Antique stores, Websites, Local Sources are all places go buy bamboo products.



Bamboo lamps at Pottery Barn. (Bradley, 2009)
Bamboo lamps at Pottery Barn. (Bradley, 2009)





Making the Product







Beneficial Impacts


The need for flooring is apparent: we all need our homes to have walk-able surfaces.Flooring made with Japanese Timber Bamboo is becoming more and more popular. Not only is it walk-able, Madake flooring is environmentally friendly, efficient to use and purchase, superior quality, and affordable. That is what makes it much an excellent product to society.


First, Madake is the hardest of the giant bamboo types, making it extremely durable. The rate of production is so high, if the floor becomes damaged it is easy to find a replacement at your local hardware store (Merchant, 2009). Because they are being produced in such masses, is common to find excellent quality Madake flooring, for an inexpensive price.

Secondly, in the production of most wood materials, during the process of milling, the excess shavings are discarded. That is not the case of bamboo though; these shavings are placed atop of the fillets ("How Bamboo Flooring is Made," 2000-2010) for a unique texture. Though it is obvious clear that its environmental benefits well surpasses the common tree, it is also the best bamboo to use.


Strand woven bamboo
Strand woven bamboo

Some may wonder, “How is Japanese Timber Bamboo flooring any different than any other flooring?” Well, the answer to that is bountiful. The production and use of Japanese Timber Bamboo will have less of an environment impact as opposed to conventional trees used for wood. The average oak trees take up to 20 years to mature (Lenna, 2010), making it difficult to replace quickly. Japanese timber Bamboo, only takes 4-6 years to mature ("Timber bamboo in," 2009), making it a sustainable resource. Once any tree’s trunk is cut, it cannot grow back; it can not be used to make products anymore. Bamboos, on the other hand, have the ability to regenerate healthy shoots once they have been cut, just as long as the roots stay intact. Thus, this is why, Phyllostachys Bambusoides’ flooring is replacing other types.

Flooring (iezzi, 2009)
Flooring (iezzi, 2009)


Flooring made with Japanese Timber Bamboo is beneficial to society in multiple ways. It is generally good quality and inexpensive, it is more efficient in its production, and it is more sustainable than other resources. In conclusion, Japanese Timber Bamboo flooring is on the rise, due to the obvious benefits it brings to society.




Negative Impacts


Though bamboo is known for its environmental benefits, the opposite is sometimes true. Some companies use bamboos which are premature and not ready fully ready to be used. Some companies use high level of cheap and environmentally harmful glue. This does often result in lower prices, the value of the product decreases as well.


Mouse eating fruit of a Bamboo plant. (feww, 2010)
Mouse eating fruit of a Bamboo plant. (feww, 2010)


The product of Japanese Timber Bamboo flooring obviously requires the presence of Japanese Timber Bamboo. This means that the growing stage is part of the production process. Unfortunately this process is not always positive. The reproduction cycle of bamboos have baffled scientist for years; and even till this day it is still a mystery. The Japanese Timber Bamboo take 130 year intervals until the species simultaneously (sometimes even when on opposite ends of the earth) have a mass flowering ("Japanese timber bamboo," 2008). Hundreds of thousands Madake Bamboo will grow nutritious pear sized fruit. Rodents, such as mice and rats are very attracted to it, so they come in the millions to seek it out (feww, 2010). This causes the rodents to have a hasty increase in their breeding rate. In a matter of weeks, there will be a rodent infestation. People will be sick from the many diseases that rodents carry. Even post-flowering, the damage will be difficult to undo. In rural areas (where bamboos are usual grown) the crops will suffer and people will face serious food shortages (feww, 2010).




Conclusion


The Japanese Timber Bamboo is a tall erect plant which grows in sunny areas with a temperature higher than negative 15 degrees Celsius. Once the green and shiny outside layer is cut off, the inside can be used to make several products. Being dense, it has the capability to make quality flooring amongst other things. Madake flooring is more efficient, environmentally friendly, and sustainable than most of its competitors. In contrast, Phyllostachys bambusoides can be harmful when the massive flowering of the entire plant genus species, create fruits. . Ever 130 years, these fruits attract rodents which can cause illnesses and famine in the area. Overall, the Japanese Timber Bamboo is useful and should play a more dominant role in today’s society.


Japanese Timber Bamboo plants("Japanese timber bamboo," 2009)
Japanese Timber Bamboo plants("Japanese timber bamboo," 2009)


Cut Madake Bamboo (Yung, 2009)
Cut Madake Bamboo (Yung, 2009)


Finished product (Gedalyahu, 2010)
Finished product (Gedalyahu, 2010)






Bibliography

TEXT:

ma, m. (1997-2010). Growing bamboo shoots for eating. Retrieved from http://www.gardenguides.com/113061-growing-bamboo-shoots-eating.html

Hidalgo, O.H. (2010). How to harvest bamboo?. Retrieved from http://www.guaduabamboo.com/bamboo-preservation/harvest-bamboo/

Japanese timber bamboo - phyllostachys bambusoides . (2008). Retrieved from http://www.completebamboo.com/species_bamboo/Phyllostachys_bambusoides.html

Phyllostachys bambusoides. (2003). Retrieved from http://www.bamboogarden.com/Phyllostachys%20bambusoides.htm

How bamboo flooring is made. (2000-2010). Retrieved from http://learn.builddirect.com/bamboo-flooring/how-bamboo-flooring-made/

Merchant, B.M. (2009, september 18). Why buy and use bamboo products?. Retrieved from http://planetgreen.discovery.com/home-garden/remeber-bamboo.html

Lenna, L.A. (2010, April 15). The life of oak trees. Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/about_6308027_life-oak-trees.html

Timber bamboo in canada. (2009). [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq4_APKhMsk&feature=related

feww, . (2010, April 26). What has flowering of bamboo plants got to do with famine and war?. Retrieved from http://feww.wordpress.com/2010/04/26/how-flowering-bamboos-cause-famine/



PICTURES:

Phyllostachys bambusoides - japanese timber bamboo. [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.completebamboo.com/species_bamboo/Phyllostachys_bambusoides.html

Bradley, L.B. (Photographer). (2009). Garden of da lights. [Web]. Retrieved from http://ecosalon.com/garden-of-da-lights/

iezzi, . (Photographer). (2009). Teait flooring. [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.taitflooring.com.au/pages/whats-new/new-product/style-antique-bamboo-flooring.php

Japanese timber bamboo plants [phyllostachys bambusoides]. (2009). [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.tytyga.com/product/Japanese+Timber+Bamboo+Plants

feww, . (Photographer). (2010). How flowering bamboos can cause famine, war. [Web]. Retrieved from http://feww.wordpress.com/2010/04/26/how-flowering-bamboos-cause-famine/

Yung, P.Y. (Photographer). (2009). What is madake bamboo?. [Web]. Retrieved from http://yungflutes.com/guide/faq/what_is_madake_bamboo/

Gedalyahu, T.B.G. (Photographer). (2010). Retrieved from http://ilenvironment.multiply.com/journal

Japanese timber bamboo plants [phyllostachys bambusoides]. (2010). [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.tytyga.com/product/Japanese+Timber+Bamboo+Plants

Page not found. [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.spendwisor.com/images/growing-bamboo-shoots.html

JOONE, . (Photographer). (2010). Nong khai beer house. [Web]. Retrieved from http://joonelovesfood.blogspot.com/